CAN-BIKE
CAN-BIKE Courses
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Children’s Courses

Kids CAN-BIKE Course

The Kids CAN-BIKE course is taught in a variety of formats, but the same material is taught in each course. Here is the basic outline. Material taught is appropriate to the ability and needs of students. This course is accredited by Cycling Canada.

Objective: Young cyclists aged 9 to 14 learn to ride safely on residential streets.

Course outline:

Classroom:

  • Traffic dynamics – rules of the road, entering the street, driveways, straight riding, position from the curb, riding beside parked cars, intersections, signs and signal lights, right and left turns, streetcar/railway tracks, walk at crossovers, sidewalk riding, bike trails, fun quiz.
  • Picking your route – choosing a safe route and planning.
  • Videos – Bicycle Safety CampGearing Up or A Kids’ Eye View

Outdoors/Indoors:

  • Safety equipment – helmets, reasons to wear helmets, helmet fit, additional equipment.
  • Bicycle – how bikes work, equipment (visible/audible/clothing), bike fit, ABCD Bike Check, bike security, bike parts, bike maintenance and care.

On Road:

  • Group riding – cycling technique, group riding etiquette.
  • Handling skills – getting on and off the bike, straight line riding, shoulder check, signalling, quick stop, rock dodge, slalom, gearing, turning.
  • Riding on residential streets/bike hike – yield before entering the street, driveways, position from curb, parked cars, intersections, stops (two-way and all-way), right of way, pedestrians, right turns, left turns, T-intersection, pedestrian style turns, traffic lights*, crossing tracks*, crosswalks, right turn only lane*, bridges and underpasses*.

*As appropriate to students’ skill level and availability of teaching locations in local neighbourhoods.

Upon completion, participants receive a CAN-BIKE certificate card.

 

Kids CAN-BIKE Festival

Introduction

The Kids’ CAN-BIKE Festival is a playground-based event that introduces children to key bike handling skills they will need to ride safely on the road. The Festival is designed for children between the ages of 5 and 7. It is the first step in the Cycling Canada CAN-BIKE Program.

It is important that children go on from the Festival to participate in the Kids’ CAN-BIKE on-road course for 9 to 14 year olds. The CAN-BIKE Program teaches that the bicycle is a vehicle and a cyclist has all the rights and responsibilities of other road users.

You can co-teach the on-road course to children with a certified instructor, if you have your CAN-BIKE 2 certificate and have participated in the Kids CAN-BIKE Seminar. Contact your provincial cycling association for a course near you.

Injury prevention

The skills developed in the Kids CAN-BIKE Festival address major injury prevention concerns for children age eight and older. A key group are 10-to-12-year-olds. Most cycling falls and collisions are preventable. As with swimming lessons, an investment now in cycling training can pay off in the prevention of serioius injury and lead to greater enjoyment of cycling.

Cycling is a life-long activity that contributes to fitness and good health. By cycling, people can make a direct contribution to the environment and can begin to see their neighbourhood and community in a whole new way. Most important, though, cycling is fun. With this course, cyclists begin the training they need to overcome the fear of traffic and other barriers that prevent people from cycling and being able to experience the joy of moving the body and propelling it through space on a bicycle.

Targeted intervention

The Kids CAN-BIKE Festival targets bicycle safety where it can do the most good.

  • It uses trained instructors and provides an incentive for people in the community to get trained through the Cycling Canada CAN-BIKE Instructor program.
  • It trains children when they are developmentally ready to be trained.
  • It addresses injury prevention priorities.
  • It is part of a nationally recognized, progressive program of courses called CAN-BIKE.
  • It promotes the importance of on-road training with Kids CAN-BIKE.
  • It is recognized by Cycling Canada Cyclisme, a national organization, recognized internationally, whose main reason for being is the organization and promotion of cycling in Canada.

Guiding principle

The guiding principle of the Festival is discovery. Often, bike education is either competitive or rule based. Sometimes, it emphasizes fun without addressing safety directly. The Kids CAN-BIKE Festival keeps the fun, but also provides substance.

Festival outline:

Equipment sections:

  • Helmet and clothing check.
  • Carrying things.
  • Bike check and fit.

Riding stations:

  • Straight line riding.
  • Shoulder checking.
  • Signalling.
  • Braking and stopping.
  • Stop and go.

Bike security station:

  • Locking your bike.

For children 5 – 7 years old and their parents/caregivers:

  • Young Riders Centre.
 
Beginner Adult Courses
 

Adult Learn to Ride 1

CAN-BIKE Adult Learn to Ride 1 is a course for adults who cannot ride a bike. You will learn to balance, start, stop and turn. 1 – 2 persons per course. 3 hours.

Course objective: Adults who have never ridden a bicycle learn how to ride a bicycle.

Course outline:

  1. Introductions and registration.
  2. Helmet and bike fundamentals:
    • Helmet information and fit.
    • How a bike works: power transmission, steering, brakes and gears.
    • Bike fit.
    • Bike check – ABC Quick Check.
  3. Learn to ride (including rest break):
    • Coast and balance.
    • Pedal and steer.
    • Go and stop.
  4. Concurrent topics (during Learn to Ride session):
    • Bike safety equipment.
    • Clothing and carrying things.
    • Bike types and uses.
    • Bike parts.
    • Bike security.
  5. Next steps:
    • Practice tips.
    • CAN-BIKE Adult Learn to Ride 2 and the CAN-BIKE program.
  6. Recap:
    • Questions.
    • Debrief.
    • Course evaluation.

Adult Learn to Ride 2

CAN-BIKE Adult Learn to Ride 2 is a course for adults who are too unsteady to ride on streets. You will learn to balance, start, turn and use your gears with confidence. 1 – 2 persons per course. 3 hours.

Course objective: Adults who have never ridden a bicycle learn how to ride a bicycle.

Course outline:

  1. Introductions and registration.
  2. Helmet and bike fundamentals:
    • Helmet information and fit.
    • How a bike works: power transmission, steering, brakes and gears.
    • Bike fit.
    • Bike check – ABC Quick Check.
  3. Learn to ride (including rest break):
    • Coast and balance.
    • Pedal and steer.
    • Go and stop.
    • Straight line riding.
    • Braking.
    • Riding with one hand.
    • Shoulder checks.
    • Signals.
    • Gearing.
  4. Concurrent topics (during Learn to Ride session):
    • Bike safety equipment.
    • Clothing and carrying things.
    • Bike types and uses.
    • Bike parts.
    • Bike security.
  5. Next steps:
    • Practice tips.
    • CAN-BIKE 1 and the CAN-BIKE program.
  6. Recap:
    • Questions.
    • Debrief.
    • Course evaluation.

 

More Advanced Adult Courses
 

CAN-BIKE 1 Course

The CAN-BIKE 1 course is taught in a variety of formats, but the same material is taught in each course. Here is the basic outline. Material taught is appropriate to the ability and needs of the students. The course is accredited by Cycling Canada.

Course objective: Cyclists aged 14 and up learn skills and build confidence to ride safely on residential streets.

Course outline:

Classroom:

  • Traffic dynamics – where to ride on the road, position within lane, lane choice, intersection positioning, residential and pedestrian-style left turns, single streetcar/railroad track, principles of traffic flow.

Outdoors/Indoors:

  • Equipment – helmets, bike selection, how bikes work, bike parts, bike fit, safety equipment, ABC Quick Check, bike security.
  • Basic maintenance – tool kit, lubrication, flats.

Road:

  • Group riding skills – cycling technique, group riding etiquette.
  • Handling skills – straight line riding, shoulder check, signalling, rock dodge, quick stop, slalom, gearing.
  • Riding on residential streets – entering the roadway, position within the lane, parked cars, lane choice and changes, yielding and right of way, intersections, right turns, right turn only lane*, residential left turns, pedestrian style left turns, crossing streetcar/railway tracks*.

* As appropriate to students’ skill level and availability of teaching locations in local neighbourhoods.

Upon completion, participants will receive a CAN-BIKE certificate card.

Cycling Freedom for Women

CAN-BIKE Cycling Freedom for Women is a course for women, taught by women. The course content is similar to CAN-BIKE 1, but addresses specific concerns such as security at night and riding with children. Content includes: how traffic works, riding with children, proper cycling equipment, basic maintenance, bike handling skills, group riding, riding on quiet streets and minor arterials. 12 hours

Course objective: Women aged 14 and up learn skills and build confidence to ride safely on residential streets. This course is taught by women, for women.

Course outline:

Classroom or outdoors:

Traffic dynamics and principles of traffic flow – positioning on road, within lane and within intersection, lane choice, residential and pedestrian style turns, single streetcar/railway tracks.

Riding conditions and energy basics – health issues for women cyclists, personal security, riding with/supervising children.

Equipment basics – helmets, bike selection, how bikes work, bike parts, bike fit, safety equipment, ABC Quick Check, bike security, basic maintenance, tool kit, lubrication, flats.

On road:

Group riding skills – cycling technique, group riding etiquette.

Handling skills – straight line riding, shoulder checking, signalling, rock dodge, quick stop, slalom, gearing.

Riding on residential streets – entering the roadway, position within lane, parked cars, lane choice and changes, yielding right of way, intersections, right turns, right turn only lanes*, residential left turns, pedestrian style left turns, crossing streetcar/railway tracks*.

Review of security issues in on-road situations.

* As appropriate to student skill level and class time.

Rural Cycling

Rural Cycling is a new course that provides an in-depth look at riding outside urban areas. The course is for the rural resident and the urban resident who tours in rural areas.

This one or two day course, depending on options chosen, helps you understand the unique conditions of rural riding, including traffic dynamics, bicycle touring, group riding, energy basics, riding conditions and how to use trailers.

But that’s not all! You’ll learn about rural cycling issues related to gravel roads, small bridges and cattle guards, pavement-gravel transitions, road shoulder hazards, rumble strips and motorist overtaking errors. You’ll learn how to deal with situations from both the cyclist’s and motorist’s viewpoint.

The Rural Cycling course is taught in a variety of formats depending on the abilities and needs of the participants and the amount of time allocated. This course is accredited by Cycling Canada.

Course Objective: Cyclists aged 14 and up learn skills and build confidence to ride safely on rural roads.

Course Outline for 12-hour, 2-day course:

Classroom

Day 1

  • Introductions
  • Road hazards – rural riding experience with emphasis on road and shoulder type, sight-lines and motorist actions.
  • Traffic dynamics – where to ride on the road.
  • About Helmets – fit and specifications, may be done outdoors.
  • About Bikes – bike fit and bike check, may be done outdoors.


Day 2

  • Road hazards – rural riding experience with emphasis on road and shoulder type, sight-lines and motorist actions.
  • See Topics Table. Refer to the topics not discussed on day 1.
  • Traffic dynamics – where to ride on the road.
  • About touring and group riding techniques.
  • Energy basics and riding conditions – overview for tourists.
On Road
  • Handling skills – a variety of drills to help you develop a better understanding of what you and your bicycle are capable of.
  • Group riding etiquette and techniques – how to ride safely with other cyclists.
  • Riding on rural roads – turning theory into practice. We try to find as many local road features as we can to demonstrate as much of the classroom component as possible. We will endeavour to demonstrate Cyclists position from the edge of roadway, in left turns, over railway tracks, through 4-way intersections, in merges and diverges, near trucks, over road shoulder hazards, cattle guards, rumble strips, gravel roads and transitions to pavement, while occasionally stopping to discuss cyclist and motorist errors.
Next Steps
  • Practice tips to continuously improve you skills and knowledge.
  • Other courses in the CAN-BIKE Program.
  • Recap.
  • Verbal quiz.
  • Debrief.
  • Course evaluation.

Commuter Cycling Skills

One-day course for urban cyclists

Cycling to school or work offers significant challenges to both novice and experienced cyclists. This course concentrates on helping all cyclists recognise common road hazards and what to do about them.

This one-day course augments the skills of recreational and commuter cyclists who want to improve their competence and comfort level in traffic. Traffic problems are presented, then ridden through and discussed. Participants also learn more about the legal status of bicycles and essential bicycle handling techniques.

Course Outline:

Section I – Classroom:
  1. Introductions.
  2. Highway Traffic Act – rights and responsibilities.
  3. Traffic Dynamics – the basics for making good decisions in traffic.
  4. Helmet Fit and Safety Equipment.
Section II – Practical:
  1. Bike Check.
  2. Bike Handling skills – how to be predictable and avoid collisions.
  3. On-road riding skills – on major arterial roads.